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BERKELEY ACADEMY: 'SIMPLY THE BEST ....'

 

UPDATED: 23/05/2022 at 16:00

THE ACADEMY IS FULLY OPEN AND OPERATING AS NORMAL FROM TUESDAY 22 FEBRUARY 2022.

CONTENTS

 

CONTENTS

 

CHANGES TO THE ISOLATION GUIDANCE: IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS OR TEST POSITIVE

23 MAY 2022

LETTER TO PARENTS FROM PUBLIC HEALTH HOUNSLOW including vaccinations for 5-11 year olds

23 MAY 2022

NEW: IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS  28 FEB 2022
NEW: CONFLICT IN EUROPE  28 FEB 2022
SUMMER 2022 SATS ARRANGEMENTS 01 MAR 2022
BERKELEY'S RESPONSE TO THE PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID - ENGLAND  21 FEB 2022
ACADEMY TERM DATES 2022   21 FEB 2022
TIMINGS OF THE ACADEMY DAY 2022  01 SEP 2022
CLASS TEACHERS AND TEACHING ASSISTANTS  01 JAN 2022
OTHER KEY STAFF  01 JAN 2022
RESPONSE TO THE PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID - ENGLAND  21 FEB 2022
COVID RISK & INFORMATION   21 FEB 2022
THE PM'S PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID (SUMMARY)  21 FEB 2022

 

CHANGES TO THE ISOLATION GUIDANCE: IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS OR TEST POSITIVE. NEW GUIDANCE: 25 APRIL 2022

The Government has issued two new generic guidance documents to subsume and replace Coronavirus specific guidance previously issued.

These are: 

·         EMERGENCY PLANNING & RESPONSE for education, childcare, and children’s social care settings - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) – alongside health and safety guidance

·         HEALTH PROTECTION in education and childcare settings - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

SOME KEY CHANGES

Specific guidance for Covid-19 has been withdrawn or changed and schools are referred to the standard guidance applying to any respiratory infectious disease

·         If a child or a young person of school age has a positive COVID-19 test result they should try to stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people for 3 whole days after the day when they took the test. The risk of passing the infection on to others is much lower after 3 days, if they feel well and do not have a high temperature. They can return to school on Day 4 regardless of whether they continue to test positive or not.

·         If an adult has a positive COVID-19 test result they should try to stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people for 5 whole days after the day, they took the test. They can return to school / work on Day 6 regardless of whether they continue to test positive or not.

·         Anyone with mild symptoms such as a runny nose, sore throat, or mild cough, who are otherwise well, does not need to test and can continue to attend their education or childcare setting.

·         Anyone who is unwell and has a high temperature should stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people. They can go back to education or childcare setting when they no longer have a high temperature and they are well enough.

 

OTHER HEALTH ALERTS: SCARLET FEVER AND CHICKEN POX

There has been an increase in the number of scarlet fever and chickenpox outbreaks linked to early years and primary schools recently, including some where both infections are co-circulating.

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic there has been little chickenpox activity. Due to pandemic and reduced mixing a larger proportion of children in Reception and Year 1 age remain susceptible to chickenpox infection.

Guidelines for public health management of scarlet fever outbreaks

Free LFD tests and Free PCR tests are no longer available in England. Community Testing has ended in England. 

The academy will provide LFD testing for those staff who wish to continue testing twice weekly for the remainder of the academic year and may require testing by pupils or staff who appear symptomatic. 

The academy can take the decision to refuse a pupil, authorised visitor or member 

PUBLIC HEALTH HOUNSLOW - LETTER TO PARENTS

LIVING WITH COVID – INFORMATION FOR PARENTS

Due to high immunity in society, a greater understanding of the virus and improved access to treatments, we can now focus on how we live with COVID-19.

From 1 April, routine covid testing is no longer expected in all education settings.

Following expert advice, we know that Covid presents a low risk of serious illness to most children and young people, and most of those who are fully vaccinated.

However, Covid is still circulating in the community and can be harmful to some vulnerable people.

If you or an adult family member has tested positive for Covid you are advised to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for five days, which is when you are most infectious.

For children and young people, the advice is to stay home for three days.

 

GENERAL ADVICE AROUND RESPIRATORY CONDITIONS CHILDREN’S SOCIAL CARE SETTINGS.

Children and young people who are unwell and have a high temperature should stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people. They can go back to education or childcare setting when they no longer have a high temperature, and they are well enough.

What are schools doing?

All schools should have in place infection prevention and control measures that will help to manage the spread of infection, including:

  • Ensuring all eligible groups are enabled and supported to take up the offer of national vaccination programmes including COVID-19 and flu.
  • Ensuring occupied spaces are well-ventilated and let fresh air in.
  • Reinforcing good hygiene practices such as hand washing and cleaning.

 

What can you do to reduce the risk of catching and passing on COVID-19:

  • Get vaccinated
  • Let fresh air in if meeting indoors, or meeting outside
  • Trying to stay at home if you are unwell
  • Washing your hands and following advice to ‘Catch it, Bin it, Kill it’

 

Vaccination

We continue to encourage young people to get vaccinated. If your child has not been vaccinated, you can read more about the vaccine programme www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/

12 to 15 year olds will still be able to access the vaccine outside of schools at a vaccination centre, pharmacy or walk-in centre.

  • 5-11 year olds are now being offered the COVID-19 vaccine in pharmacies, GPs and community sites.
  • On Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays 5-11 year olds can be vaccinated with their parents or parental consent at

 

CRANFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Picasso Centre (Bhogal Pharmacy): BOOK ONLINE OR WALK IN WITHOUT AN APPOINTMENT

Parents of 5–11-year-olds should also have received a letter from the NHS with further information.

Parents can book a Covid-19 vaccination online at:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/book-coronavirus-vaccination/  or call 119. 

Alternatively, you can find out about walk-in community sites at:

https://www.hounslow.gov.uk/homepage/223/vaccination_centres_in_hounslow

IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS OR TEST POSITIVE

You should book a PCR test and isolate and take an LFD test from 5 days after your symptoms started (or the day your test was taken if you did not have symptoms) followed by another one the next day.

Staff, Students & AUTHORISED VISITORS: If both these tests’ results are negative, staff and students can return to school. 

All isolation ends on Day 10, unless a person has an on-going fever 

Important Note: The academy can take the decision to refuse a pupil, authorised visitor or member of staff if, in its reasonable judgement, it is necessary to protect other pupils and staff from possible infection with COVID-19. 

 

 

CONFLICT IN EUROPE

The situation in Europe is very worrying and will be even more sensitive for some, particularly anyone with family who are directly impacted by it.

Most of our views and the things we think we know as facts are determined largely by what we hear or see in the media, and they may or may not be wholly accurate.  

The conflict in Ukraine may only be in its early stages, although it may be a positive sign that the Ukrainian and Russian governments are now sitting at the same table and talking about a potential ceasefire and resolution, but the conflict continues.  

There is no certainty about how the situation may escalate or de-escalate, and even this uncertainty will worry some, particularly the rhetoric around the use of weapons of mass destruction.  

Whilst the U.K. is geographically reasonable distant from current events, some in our school and community will be directly affected and may have families or roots in the region.

There is also a risk of those not directly involved developing polarised views based on what they hear or see in the media.

It is important to remember that we have students with links to both Russia and Ukraine and to other countries affected by the conflict, directly or, for example, because of the unfolding refugee situation. No-one should feel ostracised by our community because of any protected characteristic, including race.

It is important that all our students are safeguarded, regardless of heritage and it is extremely important that we do not add to any of their burdens by what we say and do.

We will support all our children equitably. People on both sides of the conflict are at risk, being injured and dying. Our response must be humanitarian, not partisan.

The news and social media feeds are filled with the latest information and disinformation, some of it is very upsetting and worrying; and a lot of what is being talked about is unverified, even when it is claimed to have been verified.

Children listening and viewing distressing images can become frightened and fearful. Under no circumstances will the academy add to that distress by, for example, using distressing images or making distressing statements.

Real people are losing their homes, lives, family members, and futures. There is no place for anyone to celebrate the violence and heartbreak.

For some in our community, such conflict will be new, for others it may remind them of traumas past.

Sensitivity is paramount.

We will likely be issuing more specific guidance in due course but there are some general principles which should be adhered to in the interim.

  • Our stance will be humanitarian
  • Schools need to command the confidence of our whole diverse and multi-opinioned society

 

Resources For Parents

Here are some background reading resources to help you think about how adults can support children with what they are seeing or feeling.

Current information regarding Ukraine

Supporting your child if they see upsetting content online about what is happening in Ukraine (Childnet)
https://www.childnet.com/blog/supporting-your-child-with-upsetting-content/

How to talk to children about what’s happening in Ukraine and World War Three anxiety (Metro)
https://metro.co.uk/2022/02/24/how-to-talk-to-children-about-whats-happening-in-ukraine-16163133/

Help for teachers and families to talk to pupils about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and how to help them avoid misinformation (Department for Education)
https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2022/02/25/help-for-teachers-and-families-to-talk-to-pupils-about-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-and-how-to-help-them-avoid-misinformation/

Information produced previously about war and international violence

How and when to talk to children about war, according to a parenting expert (Independent)
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/children-war-talk-russia-ukraine-b2023695.html

How to cope with traumatic news - an illustrated guide (ABC News, Australia)
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-23/illustrated-guide-coping-traumatic-news/5985104

Talking with Children About War and Violence in the World (Family Education, US)
https://www.familyeducation.com/life/wars/talking-children-about-war-violence-world

Tips for parents and caregivers on media coverage of traumatic events (The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, US)
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/tips-parents-and-caregivers-media-coverage-traumatic-events

The Key has created a free pack of resources for all schools which includes:

• How to talk to pupils: https://key.sc/3vFsVzU
• Parent information and support pack: http://key.sc/3IKqZtw
• How to adapt your curriculum: https://key.sc/3CaUgLD

How to talk to your teenager about the invasion of Ukraine (BBC Bitesize/Anna Freud Centre)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zbrdjsg

How To Talk To Your Child About The War In Ukraine (YoungMinds)
https://www.youngminds.org.uk/parent/blog/top-tips-for-talking-to-your-young-person-about-the-events-in-ukraine/

Worrying about Russia and Ukraine (Childline)
https://www.childline.org.uk/get-involved/articles/worrying-about-russia-ukraine/

Worrying about war and conflict Sarah Dove (Phoenix Education Consultancy)
https://www.phoenixgrouphq.com/tools

 

 

Schools have some freedom to teach about sensitive, challenging, and controversial political issues but need to exercise caution in difficult and sensitive circumstances where the boundaries of what is and isn’t appropriate and in line with the legal duties, may not be clear

When teaching pupils about racism, teachers should be clear that racism has no place in our society and help pupils to understand facts about this and the law.

Schools and other specified authorities are also subject to the Prevent duty under Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. Schools should provide a safe space in which children, young people and staff can understand and discuss sensitive topics.

As a general principle, teachers and school staff should avoid expressing their own personal political views to pupils.

Political issues are likely to be raised outside of planned teaching and activities, mainly when pupils raise these themselves or ask and comment about live political issues.

 

EUROPE SUMMARY GUIDANCE

  • The conflict in Europe is very worrying and there is a great deal of heartache
  • There are children and families from both sides of the conflict in our school and community
  • There are also children from other countries which are affected by, for example, the resulting population movement / refugee situation
  • The conflict is a political issue, but it is a humanitarian crisis too
  • The conflict is in some ways more sensitive as it is topical
  • It is difficult to know which sources of information are reliable and that makes agreeing what are facts more difficult. Schools and Teachers need to exercise caution in difficult and sensitive circumstances where the boundaries of what is and isn’t appropriate and in line with the legal duties, may not be clear
  • There is a safeguarding obligation which must be upheld equitably for all, regardless of heritage
  • There are risks of polarisation and racism which must not be accepted or tolerated. There is no place for racism (or any protected characteristic) inequality at Cranford or in society.  Schools should continue to take steps to tackle racist and discriminatory attitudes or incidents - and condemn racism within the school and wider society. Challenging intolerant, racist or discriminatory views where these are shared at school should be seen as part of schools’ wider anti-bullying and safeguarding duties.
  • Consensus also risks an inherent bias. Schools need to command the confidence of our whole diverse and multi-opinioned society
  • Our response as a school and professionals will be humanitarian and non-partisan
  • Any coverage or discussions around this topic must be age appropriate
  • Sharing personal views within the hearing of pupils are likely to be highly unwise and potentially worse in this specific situation
  • Our prevent and ant-radicalisation duties are relevant to any conversations and teaching in relation to this conflict
  • There is no need to show images of the on-going violence, heartache and destruction in school, it is widely available outside school and parents will decide whether it is appropriate for their children to watch.
  • Schools should consider how pupil-led activity feeds into a wider sense of political balance across the school. They should also take steps to ensure all pupils are exposed to a diverse range of views in both the curriculum and wider school activity.

 

The legal restrictions on publicly funded bodies on the run up to the local elections at the start of May 2022, covering:The current situation for is further affected by:

  • promotion of political views in teaching
  • use of budgets and annual grants
  • restrictions on political activity
  • activities to promote political awareness to pupils
  • use of school premises for election meeting

Schools should take a reasonable and proportionate approach to ensuring political impartiality, alongside their other responsibilities.

This includes legal requirements under the:

  • Equality Act 2010 (including the Public Sector Equality Duty for state-funded schools)
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Prevent duty

Schools are also required to actively promote the fundamental British values of:

  • democracy
  • the rule of law
  • individual liberty
  • mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

 

SUMMER 2022 SATs ARRANGEMENTS

THE WEEK BEGINNING MONDAY 9 MAY 2022 IS KEY STAGE 2 SATS WEEK

Pupils in Year 6 will sit statutory SATs (Standard Attainment Tests) in May 2022.

The tests will comprise of a Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar paper, a Reading paper and three Maths papers: Arithmetic, Reasoning 2 and Reasoning 3.

 

Monday 9 May 2022 and Tuesday 10 May 2022

  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 1: questions
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 2: spelling
  • English reading

Wednesday 11 May 2022

  • Mathematics Paper 1: arithmetic 
  • Mathematics Paper 2: reasoning

Thursday 12 May 2022

  • Mathematics Paper 3: reasoning

 

In preparation for this, Berkeley Academy has been running additional Booster sessions for all pupils in Year 6 since September 2021, all pupils have been allocated CGP revision materials which they have been trained in using effectively and independently.

Pupils at Berkeley Academy are formally assessed every half term – this prepares the pupils for statutory tests, allows teaching staff to complete thorough gap analyses to set targets and to support future lesson planning.

The academy will be running Easter School from Monday 11th April to Thursday 14th 2022, which all pupils are expected to attend.

The Year 6 staff will also be posting a video aimed to answer FAQ for parents/carers, providing further information on SATs week, etc.

There will be an opportunity for parents/carers to submit questions prior to the release of the video.

 

KEY STAGE 2 GRAMMAR, PUNCTUATION AND SPELLING TEST

The grammar, punctuation and spelling test consists of two parts: a grammar and punctuation paper requiring short answers, lasting 45 minutes, and an aural spelling test of 20 words, lasting around 15 minutes.

The grammar and punctuation test includes two sub-types of questions:

  • Selected response, e.g. ‘Identify the adjectives in the sentence below.’ 
  • Constructed response, e.g. ‘Correct/complete/rewrite the sentence below,’ or, ‘The sentence below has an apostrophe missing. Explain why it needs an apostrophe.’ 

 

KEY STAGE 2 READING

The reading test is one single paper, with questions based on three text passages.

Your child will have one hour to complete the test, including reading time.

There are a selection of question types, including

  • Ranking/ordering, e.g. ‘Number the events below to show the order in which they happen in the story.’ 
  • Labelling, e.g. ‘Label the text to show the title of the story.’ 
  • Find and copy, e.g. ‘Find and copy one word that suggests what the weather is like in the story.’ 
  • Short constructed response, e.g. ‘What does the bear eat?’ 
  • Open-ended response, e.g. ‘Look at the sentence that begins Once upon a time. How does the writer increase the tension throughout this paragraph? Explain fully, referring to the text in your answer.’

 

KEY STAGE 2 MATHS

Children sit three papers in maths:

  • Paper 1: arithmetic, 30 minutes 
  • Papers 2 and 3: reasoning, 40 minutes per paper 

Paper 1 consists of fixed response questions, where children have to give the correct answer to calculations, including long multiplication and division.

Papers 2 and 3 will involve a number of question types, including

  • Multiple choice
  • True or false
  • Constrained questions, e.g. giving the answer to a calculation, drawing a shape or completing a table or chart
  • Less constrained questions, where children will have to explain their approach for solving a problem

Test results will be available to schools on Tuesday 5 July 2022

For each pupil registered for the tests, schools will receive:

  • A raw score
  • A scaled score
  • Confirmation of whether or not they reached the expected standard

What is a scaled score?

Pupil results are reported as scaled scores.

Scaled scores help test results to be reported consistently from one year to the next, as the difficulty of the test may vary slightly between years.

Scaled scores are based on raw scores, translated into a scaled score using a conversion table.

A scaled score of 100 always represents the expected standard. Pupils' scores can range between 80 and 120.

These tests are set and marked externally, and the results are used to measure the school's performance (for example, through reporting to Ofsted and published league tables).

Your child’s marks are used, in conjunction with their teacher's assessment, to give a broad picture of their levels of attainment

Although the results will not be published in 2021/22 KS2 performance tables, the statutory assessments will help parents/carers, schools and the Department for Education to understand more clearly the impact of the pandemic on pupils and how this varies between particular groups of pupils (for example, disadvantaged), schools and Local Authority areas.

At a local level, the data will provide vital information to parents/carers about their child’s attainment, support transition to secondary schools, and identify where additional support is best targeted to individuals.

At a national level, the data will help inform policy decisions about support for schools, enable analysis to underpin education recovery initiatives and to understand their effectiveness, and to track system progress as we emerge from the pandemic.

As you know, we take pupils’ learning very seriously at Berkeley Academy and are committed to achieving outstanding progress for all.

Your support in this is very important and together we will be able to ensure that your child achieves their very best and is ready for the next stage of their education.

 

BERKELEY'S RESPONSE TO THE PM'S STATEMENTS ON COVID RESTRICTIONS ENDING

The Covid risk is currently reducing, but has not been eradicated and further new variants that spread more easily will emerge, and it is possible that may be more severe, less severe or of similar severity.

Better transmition is a feature of viral evolution but the severity of each variant is a random factor. Omicron, thankfully, is less severe.

  • Our aim is to keep the academy open with as many healthy pupils and staff as possible in attendance but the responsible thing is to self-isolate if you are symptomatic and/or test positive and the academy reserves the right to refuse entry to protect others from infection in accordance with local Public Health advice.
  • At Berkeley, we will continue to encourage the wearing of facemasks in classrooms, indoors and in crowded spaces, though this will remain voluntary.
  • The reason that we are strongly encouraging facemasks in classrooms is to minimise the spread of Covid to others and in so doing reduce staff and student absence and protect the more vulnerable.
  • We have to live with the virus and we therefore need to continue to manage its impact on our families, the NHS and the academy for at least another couple of years and through more winters too.
  • As a united community, we need to take responsibility for protecting our physical and mental wellbeing and continue the steady road to normality, so we will also embrace the opportunities made more possible by deregulation.
  • We make our decisions based on risk and the risk and the advice from Public Health Hounslow.Based on the scientific and medical advice, we wholeheartedly agree with the government on the importance of vaccination, here and across the globe, and we will support further boosters, etc as necessary.In particular, we join the PM, Professor Sir Chis Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance in encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect themselves and their babies now that the evidence is unequivocal.
  • We also encourage those who have been reluctant to get fully vaccinated to keep their mind open and review their decision regularly.
  • Vaccines are currently protecting people against serious illness, hospitalisation, critical care and death very well.
  • Vaccines are not very effective in preventing the transmission of infection.Hence, to reduce spread we need other methods of reducing transmission, for example by wearing masks, worn properly indoors, when in close proximity with others and in crowded spaces.
  • We are seeking greater normality, not greater abnormality and that is why we will take proactive steps to reintroduce assemblies, encourage more trips and events and return to the broad range of opportunities for all that were synonymous with education at Berkeley Academy prior to the pandemic restrictions.
  • Testing: Universal testing of staff will continue until 1 April 2022 and then the academy will fund targeted testing of employees.
  • Isolation: Those testing positive will be encouraged to isolate out of consideration for others and the academy reserves to right to refuse entry to protect others from infection.

 

IMPACT ON THE 8 KEY COVID RISK REDUCTION MEASURES

TESTING, CONTACT TRACING & ISOLATION

  • No change: Contact tracing has already ended.
  • Change: Targeted testing of staff to continue in 2021/22 with the costs met by the academy. 

CLEANING SURFACES & REDUCING SHARING

  • Change: Fomite transmission has not been significant during the pandemic and is best managed by regularly and thorough washing of the hands.  Scale back the additional cleaning arrangements introduced during the pandemic, following a review to re-organise cleaning arrangements to deal routinely with future outbreaks.

VACCINATION

  • No change: Strongly encouraged, especially in view of the statistics for those unvaccinated and the risk to pregnant women and their bablies of not being vaccinated. 

DISTANCE (avoiding sustained /or and unprotected contact at less than 2 metres where possible): 

  • No change - good disease control

VENTILATION (Outdoors is better than indoors, indoors is safer if well ventilated): 

  • No change - we will maintain 100% fresh air air-conditioning in the main buildings and encourage ventilation in all settings

BARRIER PROTECTION (FFP2 masks, Perspex Screens, etc): 

  • No change - Masks will continue to be encouraged when indoors, in crowded places and when near a potentially vulnerable person

GOOD HAND HYGIENE (Regular and thorough hand washing and sanitising) 

  • No change - good disease control. 

SNEEZING INTO TISSUES

  • No change - good disease control

 

We are a community and need to act together as a community to protect health and wellbeing.

The journey to normality requires people to volunteer en masse when our protections are voluntary.

 

BERKELEY TERM DATES 2022

(with ‘the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee’ closure in lieu added)

SPRING TERM 2022: FEBRUARY TO MARCH 2022

NOTE: The spring 2022 break starts after school on Friday 1 April 2022

Monday, 21 February 2022: INSET 5 (Closed for students)

Tuesday, 22 February 2022: Academy opens after half-term 

Friday, 1 April 2022: Academy closes at normal times

Spring break: Saturday 2 April 2022 – Monday 18 April 2022 (17 days)

 

SUMMER TERM 2022: APRIL TO MAY 2022

Tuesday, 19 April 2022 : ACADEMY OPEN FOR ALL

Monday, 2 May 2022: May Day (Bank Holiday)

Tuesday, 3 May 2022: INSET Day 6 (Closed for students)

Thursday, 26 May 2022: Academy closes for extended half term

Friday, 27 May 2022: Academy closed in lieu of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee (3 June 2022)

Half term for all: Saturday, 28 May 2022 – Sunday, 5 June 2022 (9 days)

 

SUMMER TERM 2022: JUNE TO JULY 2022

Monday, 6 June 2022: Academy re-opens after half-term 

Thursday, 21 July 2022: Academy closes early

Friday, 22 July 2022: INSET 7 (Closed for students)

Summer break FOR STUDENTS: Friday, 22 July 2022 - Thursday 1 September 2022

 

TIMINGS OF THE ACADEMY DAY 

 

ENTRY / COLLECTION WILL CONTINUE UNCHANGED

START AND FINISH TIMES

  • AM NURSERY: 8.45 am - 11.45 am
  • PM NURSERY: 12.30 pm - 3.30 pm
  • RECEPTION and KS1: 9 am-3.15 pm
  • KS2: 8.55 am - 3.20 pm

The academy will close for staff at 6pm each weekday, except 4.30pm on Friday

 

Attendance Expectation: Full school attendance is legally compulsory. This also means arriving in good time for the start of school with your child / children (unless they are older and sufficiently mature to travel independently).  Attendance and punctuality enforcement will be strictly applied. Parents are responsible for ensuring younger pupils get to school in good time.  Beamed / remote learning will continue for any pupil required to isolate due to Covid.

Children who are unwell in the morning (e.g. with a winter vomiting bug)should stay at home for the whole day and until fully better. If necessary, they should isolate until they must isolate at least until they have the result from a PCR Covid test. To limit the spread, any student or staff member who contracts a winter bug will be asked to stay at home until well and non-infectious. 

 

TRAVEL TO SCHOOL

Students and Families should travel to school (Ideally walking or cycling), and not be dropped off by car except by prior agreement with the academy e.g.:

  • If travelling from very far,
  • If entitled to home-school transport, or if they have a relevant Special Educational Need or Disability, agreed with the academy’s SENDCo
  • If there is a relevant safeguarding need, agreed with the academy’s Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) or Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead (DDSL)
  • If there is a relevant medical need, agreed with the academy’s Designated Medical LeadIn truly exceptional circumstances, agreed with the Head of School or Deputy Head of School

 

Punctuality ExpectationPunctuality is particularly important to a return to normal learning. The academy requires every pupil to attend punctually on every school day.

Punctuality and full uniform compliance are reasonable conditions of entry. All pupils, and their parents, must meet the academy's expectation of on-time arrival or accept the consequences of not doing so.

Arriving late with accepted good reason / Essential medical appointments: Special arrangements for late admission / re-admission will be offered for any child who is absent for part of the day by prior agreement (for example, when attending a pre-booked hospital appointment that also could not have been rescheduled out of school time) if this is preferred to remote learning on that day. Otherwise, they may be offered access to beamed learning and counted as ‘present’ (educated off-site). 

Remote / beamed learning will normally be available as an alternative to pupils with an acceptable reasons for not being able to attend school fully on a particular day. This may, for example, enable the student to miss out on less of their learning by cutting out the travel time to and from school on an already shortened day. Engagement via beamed learning in these circumstances will be counted as ‘present’. 

 

DROPPING OFF AND PICKING UP CHILDREN

  • The East gate for Early Years and KS1 pupils will open at 8.30am
  • The West gate for KS2 will open at 8.30am
  • Parents will continue to drop their child(ren) at the designated gate (A new on-site, dropping off / collection area at the front of the school will be created in autumn 2021 to avoid the risk of crowding on the street)
  • Pre School and EYFS (Nursery and Reception) will be dismissed from East gateYears 1-6 will be lined up and dismissed from the holding area between East and West gates – parents/carers to collect from inside the gate, not loiter and leave immediately once they have their child(ren)

 

CLASS TEACHERS AND TEACHING ASSISTANTS 2022

 

YEAR

CLASS

TEACHER

ASSISTANT

EYFS

     

NURSERY

     
  AM Ms. Donna Maddison (DMN), PE Ms. Rupinder Hunjan (RHU)
  PM Ms. Donna Maddison (DMN), PE Ms. Rupinder Hunjan (RHU)

RECEPTION

     
  CHERRY Ms. Esha Sharma (ESA) - ECT Ms. Ridhima Mehra (RMA)
  HOLLY Ms. Magdalena Musanovic (MMC), ADT Ms. Faye Connelly (FCY)

KS1

     

YEAR 1

     
  ELM Ms. Harriet Dryden (HDN) - ECT Ms. Shirley Laycock (SLK)
  WILLOW Mr. Jaibir Birk (JBK), ICT Ms. Emma Fosh (EFH)

YEAR 2

     
  SYCAMORE Ms. Poppy Richards (PRI) - ECT Ms. Mghan Evans (MES)
  MAPLE Ms. Lydia Gamlen (LGN), EY/KS1 Ms. Jane Tickner (JTR)

LOWER KS2

     

YEAR 3

     
  HAZEL Mr. Chris Bussien (CBN), B&ATL / Y3P Ms, Rhiannon Pateman
  ROWAN Ms. Nida Malik (NMK), History & Geography Ms. Megan Kobus (MKS)

YEAR 4

     
  CHESTNUT Ms. Anisha Kawa (AKA) - ECT^ Ms. Gillian James (GJS)
  JUNIPER Ms. Shea Yarrall (SYL), Performance Arts Ms. Gillian James (GJS)

UPPER KS2

     

YEAR 5

     
  BEECH Ms. Seema Ghauri (SGI), CPD+ Mr. Philip Rogers (PRS)
  HAWTHORN Ms. Aelaha Ahmad (AAD) Mr. Philip Rogers (PRS)

YEAR 6

     
  MULBERRY Ms. Suzie Prosser (SPR), KS2 Ms. Mamuna Akthar (MAR)
  CEDAR Ms. Madhuri Tank (MTK), First Story Ms. Mamuna Akthar (MAR)
       
LANGUAGES Spanish Agency  
SPORTS COACH     Mr. Jamie Walters (JWS)
PPA TEACHERS  

Ms Hannah McFerren (HMN), PSHCE / SRE+

Ms S. Sandhu (SSU), Science / Inclusion 

 
HEAD OF EAL   Ms. Anna Perszewska (APA), EAL & T-levels Ms Farzaneh Hashemi (FHI)

JOINT

DESIGNATED

SAFEGUARDING

LEAD (JDSL)

SENDCo+

CP & Prevent

Groups (e.g. LAC,

SEND, GRT, etc.)

RE Coordinator

Ms. Dinnie Heroe (DHE), RE  

 

NOTE: RESTRUCTURING PENDING

 

OTHER KEY STAFF / WORKERS

CEO / Accounting Officer  (ADMAT)

Executive Headteacher

National Leader of Education

Mr. Kevin Prunty (KPR)
Chief Finance Officer (ADMAT) Ms. Magda Gladysz (MGZ)
School Business, Site & Premises Manager  Ms. Ami Kaur (AKR)
Trainee Finance / HR Assistant Ms. Amanda Gomez (AGZ)

Head of School (HoS): Academic Curriculum, Assessment and Progress.

English and Mathematics. Extra-Curricular. 

Overall Effectiveness (Acceleration of progress)

Quality of Education (Implementation, Impact and Consistency)

Equalities

Ms. Preeti Panesar (PPR)

Deputy Head of School (DHoS). Pastoral Curriculum and Community

Designated Safeguarding & Equalities Lead (DSL)

Quality of Education (Intent and Challenge) 

Personal Development & Progress

Ms. Jennie Lewis (JLS)
Director of Community and Business Partnerships (ADMAT) Mr. Alan Fraser (AFR)
HWBL Project Manager (ends March 2022) Mr. Taz Virdee (TVE)
Family Support Worker Ms. Charlotte Davies (CDS)

Assistant Head Teacher

English and Mathematics

Environment and Climate

Health and Wellbeing

Workload Reduction

Ms. Rachel Huynh* (RHH)
Logistics, SIMS, HR, Attendance & Admissions Officer Ms. Georgina Mahi (GMI)
Assistant Caretaker / Cleaner Mr. Rafal Slabosz (RSZ)
Cleaner Ms. Evelyn Ballard (EBD)
Cleaner Ms. Shrija Begum Ali (SBI)
Cleaner Ms Jan Paul (JPL)
Cleaner Ms Vijya Vara (VVA)
SMSA Ms. Bushra Aslam (BAM)
SMSA Ms Theepa Balaramanan (TBN)
SMSA Ms. Evelyn Ballard (EBD)
SMSA Ms. Faisa Chaudhary (FCY)
SMSA Ms. Geraldine Gore (GGO)
SMSA Ms Amina Guliye (AGE)
SMSA Ms. Sana Khan (SKN)
SMSA Ms. Kishwar Malik (KMK)
SMSA Ms. Michelle Small (MSL)
SMSA Ms Yasmin Zaman (YZN)
SMSA Ms. Fereshta Zia Ahmadi* (FZI)
Catering Assistant (Wilson Jones from 28 March 2022) Ms. Shamsa Mahmood (SMD)
Catering Assistant (Wilson Jones from 28 March 2022) Ms. Dezila (Pereira E) Da Costa (DDA)
Catering Assistant (Wilson Jones from 28 March 2022) Ms. Lalita Dhokia (LDA)

 

DECEMBER 2021 COVID REVIEW OUTCOMES 

Visitors

Only essential visitors are allowed on-site during the academy day. Reception to tighten up on the possibility of non-essential visitors coming to the academy.

Exemplifications

  • Essential visitors (who must comply with our Covid safety measures to be allowed on-site) include:

Invigilators, Sports coaches, supply staff, contractors, regular consultants and ‘workers’, Ofsted Inspectors, NHS / Public Health staff working with the academy, trainees, private examination candidates (but 2m apart from CCC candidates) …

Events / Activities

Events and Educational Visits will be encouraged. Events are taking place in accordance with the general advice on staying safeBespoke risk assessment for each event will inform any further precautions and infection control measures necessary. Covid Marshall appointed to supervise some events and intervene if needed.

Exemplifications

  • In-School meetings: In person meetings will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.
  • Assemblies: In person assemblies will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.
  • Fixtures: will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.
  • Academy Trust Board / MATB Meetings: will continue in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.
  • CPD: will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

 

VACCINATION

Academy Position

Get fully vaccinated (including boosters). If you have not yet been vaccinated, please re-consider now for your own sake, for the sake of others and to relieve the pressure on our local hospitals.

Act as a positive role model for our children by getting vaccinated yourself.

The majority of Covid patients in hospital and Covid deaths now involve those who have not been vaccinated. Don’t take the risk. Ensure you are also vaccinated against Covid and the Flu virus before the real winter sets in.

The academy will continue to encourage all staff and all eligible children to get fully vaccinated and those eligible to get their booster sooner rather than later.

Support and Encourage others to get vaccinated: If you have family members or friends who have not yet been vaccinated and are hesitant, please do everything you can to support them to overcome any barriers to getting themselves vaccinated.

Act now to keep your family and our community out of hospital in 2022  

Give Consent: If you have a child aged 12-15, please give your consent for them to have the vaccine as soon as possible to protect them and others, to safeguard their education, social development, emotional wellbeing and their mental health, to keep staff and students well enough to attend work / school, to support their schools in being able to normalise to a larger degree than otherwise, to open up clubs and events, to run school trips, to replenish sporting activities and competitions, to hold concerts, to promote extra-curricular and to support your child’s emotional well-being through a range of social interactions and activities which enhanced social and cultural capital. 

Do this for them – give them your consent. Young people over the age of 12 can get vaccinated through their school, at a local catch-up clinic, walk-in centre or by booking an appointment at a vaccination centre.

You can book online or visit one of the many walk-in centres and many are now licenced to vaccinate 12–15-year-olds accompanied by their parents or with their parents’ consent and can offer booster vaccines too. 

Bhogal Pharmacy at Cranford Community College is licensed to vaccinate 12–15-year-olds (and possibly the only pharmacy licensed locally)

Booster Time: If you are eligible for the booster vaccination (or know someone who is), please come forward quickly now so that you have maximum protection. This is particular important in the older population and those who have underlying medical conditions whose immunity from the second jab has been proven to lessen more quickly than in younger, healthy people.

Don’t delay, quick action could save lives.

Pregnant women and those still unvaccinated will continue to be offered support to get vaccinated. 

It is envisaged that children aged 5-11 may be eligible to get vaccinated in summer 2022 and parents are encouraged to give consent for their child to be immunised to protect them and others from the worst impact of Covid infection. 

 

UPDATES

  • STAFF AND PUPILS ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONTINUE TO WEAR MASKS AND MAXIMISE VENTILATION IN ANY CROWDED SPACE
  • NORMAL OCCUPANCY IS RESUMED FOR ALL ROOMS
  • THE DINING HALL WILL RETURN TO FULL USE: Classrooms will be used for lunch until the end of the spring term 2022 when our new caterers, Wilson Jones will start cooking food on site in our newly expanded and refurbished kitchens. Children can bring in packed lunches in the meantime or a buy a packed lunch (details to follow)
  • THE STAFFROOM, KITCHEN AND STAFF TOILETS TO RETURN TO NORMAL USAGE
  • PUPIL TOILETS WILL KEEP THEIR DIVIDERS
  • SCHOOL TRIPS WILL RE-START AND RESTRICTIONS ON EXTRA-CURRICULAR REMOVED: We want to encourage a return to normality and particular activities which promote good mental health.
  • We will seek opportunities for children to 'catch-up' on experiences they may have missed out on during the last two academic years.
  • Berkeley's Rewards System will be adapted to facilitate the development of social capital
  • ASSEMBLIES will resume in the Main Hall each Wednesday. In the future, some assemblies may be streamed online to parents through a 'new' parent app. 

INDEFINITE MEASURES

  • YEAR GROUP 'BUBBLES' will end
  • ADDITIONAL VENTILATION WILL BE MAINTAINED BY KEEPING EXTERNAL DOORS OPEN where appropriate and through the fresh air conditioning system. 
  • ENHANCED CLEANING REGIMES AND DISINFECTANT SPRAYING OF COMMUNAL EQUIPMENT / SPACES WILL BE REVIEWED AT EASTER 2022
  • SUPPLY OF PPE:  To continue for the foreseeable future. 

 

PERMANENT MEASURES

  • PERMANENTLY CONTINUE WITH A ‘DYNAMIC RISK ASSESSMENT’ APPROACH Our measures will be reviewed regularly to ensure they are proportionate to changing risk. This will allow us to respond quickly if the need arises.
  • Development of a new building near the East Gate to house a new Reception Area and Community Space and an extension of Early Year (Pre-School)
  • PERMANENTLY MAINTAIN LIMITATIONS ON NON-ESSENTIAL VISITORS
  • PERMANENTLY MAINTAIN SECURE OUTER SITE and develop the use of technology to ensure the highest possible site safety. LFD testing on arrival will continue as a reasonable condition of entry
  • PERMANENTLY HOLD REMOTE (ZOOM) WEEKLY STAFF MEETINGS (more inclusive) and enable remote access to some other face-to-face meetings
  • PERMANENTLY SCHEDULE ONLINE PARENTS MEETINGS via a 'new App called 'School Cloud'
  • ONLINE TRAINING AND MEETINGS will be balanced with face-to-face training and meetings, although now providing an option of beaming in instead of attending face to face
  • CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF GREATER OUTDOOR AREAS AND FURNITURE AROUND THE SITE 
  • A NEW ICT STRATEGY AND PROCUREMENT PROCESS, to include an infrastructure which supports remote learning (full migration to Google Classroom or MS Teams, portable devices suitable for home/school learning for every student, laptops suitable for home-school working for teachers, dedicated specialist equipment areas etc.) Other supportive technology (electronic message boards, No touch visitor registration, an enhanced website for better communication, etc.)
  • VENTILATION: Remains important even in the cold. Outdoor coats may be worn in classrooms if needed

 

THE PM'S 'PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID': 21 FEB 2022 (SUMMARY)

 

STATEMENT

The plan covers four main pillars:

  • Removing domestic restrictions while encouraging safer behaviours through public health advice, in common with longstanding ways of managing other infectious illnesses
  • Protecting the vulnerable through pharmaceutical interventions and testing, in line with other viruses
  • Maintaining resilience against future variants, including through ongoing surveillance, contingency planning and the ability to reintroduce key capabilities such as mass vaccination and testing in an emergency
  • Securing innovations and opportunities from the COVID-19 response, including investment in life sciences

 

The public are encouraged to continue to follow public health advice, as with all infectious diseases such as the flu, to minimise the chance of catching Covid and help protect family and friends.

This includes by letting fresh air in when meeting indoors, wearing a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you come into contact with people you don’t normally meet, and washing your hands.

The Prime Minister has today confirmed domestic legal restrictions will end on 24 February 2022 as we begin to treat Covid as other infectious diseases such as flu. This means:

The remaining domestic restrictions in England will be removed. The legal requirement to self-isolate ends.

  • Until 1 April 2022, we still advise people who test positive to stay at home.
  • Adults and children who test positive are advised to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for at least five full days and then continue to follow the guidance until they have received two negative test results on consecutive days.
  • From April 2022, the Government will update guidance setting out the ongoing steps that people with COVID-19 should take to be careful and considerate of others, similar to advice on other infectious diseases. This will align with testing changes.
  • Self-isolation support payments, national funding for practical support and the medicine delivery service will no longer be available.
  • Routine contact tracing ends, including venue check-ins on the NHS COVID-19 app.
  • Fully vaccinated adults and those aged under 18 who are close contacts are no longer advised to test daily for seven days and the legal requirement for close contacts who are not fully vaccinated to self-isolate will be removed.

 

As set out in the Autumn and Winter Plan, universal free provision of tests will end as our response to the virus changes.

From the start of April 2022, the government will end free symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public.

Limited symptomatic testing will be available for a small number of at-risk groups and we will set out further details on which groups will be eligible shortly.

Free symptomatic testing will also remain available to social care staff.

We are working with retailers to ensure that everyone who wants to can buy a test.

With Omicron now the dominant variant and less severe, levels of high immunity across the country and a range of strategies in place including vaccines, treatments, and public health knowledge, the value for taxpayers’ money is now less clear. Free testing should rightly be focused on at-risk groups.

The Government remains ready to respond if a new variant emerges and places unsustainable pressure on the NHS, through surveillance systems and contingency measures such as increased testing capacity or vaccine programmes.

Our world-leading ONS survey will allow us to continue to track the virus in granular detail to help us spot any surges in the virus.

Further changes being made include:

  • Today the guidance has been removed for staff and students in most education and childcare settings to undertake twice weekly asymptomatic testing.
  • On 24 February 2022, removing additional local authority powers to tackle local COVID-19 outbreaks (No.3 regulations). Local Authorities will manage local outbreaks in high-risk settings as they do with other infectious diseases.
  • On 24 March 2022, the Government will also remove the COVID-19 provisions within the Statutory Sick Pay and Employment and Support Allowance regulations.

 

From 1 April 2022, the Government will:

  • Remove the current guidance on voluntary COVID-status certification in domestic settings and no longer recommend that certain venues use the NHS COVID Pass.
  • No longer provide free universal symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public in England.
  • Remove the health and safety requirement for every employer to explicitly consider COVID-19 in their risk assessments.

 

PRESS CONFERENCE

When the pandemic began, we had little knowledge of this virus and none about the vaccines and treatments we have today.

So there was no option but to use government regulations to protect our NHS and save lives.

But those restrictions on our liberties have brought grave costs to our economy, our society, and the chances of our children.

So from the outset, we were clear that we must chart a course back towards normality as rapidly as possible, by developing the vaccines and treatments that could gradually replace those restrictions.

And as a result of possibly the greatest national effort in our peacetime history, that is exactly what we have done.

Thanks to our brilliant scientists.

Thanks to the extraordinary men and women of our NHS and to every one of you who has come forwards to get jabbed and get boosted - the United Kingdom has become the first country in the world to administer an approved vaccine, and the fastest major European nation to roll out both the vaccines and the booster to half our population.

We have emerged from the teeth of the pandemic before many others, retaining one of the most open economies and societies in Europe and the fastest growth in the G7 last year.

And while the pandemic is not over, we have passed the peak of the Omicron wave, with cases falling, and hospitalisations in England now fewer than 10,000 and still falling, and so now we have the chance to complete that transition back towards normality, while maintaining the contingencies to respond to a resurgence or a new variant.

In England, we will remove all remaining domestic restrictions in law.

From this Thursday, it will no longer be law to self-isolate if you test positive, and so we will also end the provision of self-isolation support payments, although Statutory Sick Pay can still be claimed for a further month.

If you’re a fully vaccinated close contact or under 18 you will no longer be asked to test daily for seven days.

And if you are close contact who is not fully vaccinated you will no longer be required to self-isolate.

Until 1 April 2022, we will still advise you to stay at home if you test positive.

But after that, we will encourage people with Covid symptoms to exercise personal responsibility, just as we encourage people who may have flu to be considerate towards others.

It is only because levels of immunity are so high and deaths are now, if anything, below where you would normally expect for this time of year that we can lift these restrictions.

And it is only because we know Omicron is less severe, that testing for Omicron on the colossal scale we have been doing is now much less valuable in preventing serious illness.

We should be proud that the UK established the biggest testing programme per person of any large country in the world.

But its budget in the last financial year was bigger than the Home Office - and it cost – the testing programme cost - £2 billion just last month alone.

So we must scale back and prioritise our resources for the most vulnerable.

From today, staff and students in most education and childcare settings will no longer be asked to undertake twice weekly asymptomatic testing.

And from 1st April 2022, we will end free symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public.

But we will continue providing free symptomatic tests to those at the highest risk from Covid.

And in line with the practice of many other countries, we are working with retailers to ensure you will always be able to buy a test.

We should be clear the pandemic is not over and there may be significant resurgences.

Our scientists are certain there will be new variants and it’s very possible that those will be worse than Omicron.

So we will continue to protect the most vulnerable with targeted vaccinations and treatments and we have bought enough doses of vaccine to anticipate a wide range of possible JCVI recommendations.

Today this includes a new Spring booster, which will be offered to those aged 75 and over, older care home residents, and those over 12 who are immunosuppressed.

We will also retain disease surveillance systems and contingency measures which can ensure our resilience in the face of future waves or new variants.

And we will build on the innovations that defined the very best of our response to the pandemic, including continuing the work of the Vaccines Task Force, which has already secured contracts with manufacturers trialling new vaccines which could provide protection against new variants.

Today is not the day we can declare victory over Covid, because this virus is not going away.

Boris Johnson, PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

End.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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