Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Statement 2016-2017

Purpose of this funding:

The government provides every school with Pupil Premium funding, which is additional to the main school funding, to help address some underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and ‘Looked after children (LAC)’ and to tackle educational disadvantage. Berkeley Primary School is in the highest quintile for free school meals (40.3% unvalidated RaiseOnline 2016) and deprivation levels are rated as high based on ward data. Pupils targeted by the Pupil Premium funding tend to be over represented in terms of under achievement on entry to the school, have fewer enrichment opportunities in the home and may be affected by lower educational aspirations.

Pupil Premium funding was introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to provide support for pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’) and for Looked After Children (LAC). Berkeley Primary School has 97 pupils currently eligible for FSM. All funded interventions aim to increase the number of targeted pupils at risk of disadvantage making expected or better than expected progress in core and foundation subjects.

The school’s total Pupil Premium funding for the year 2016-2017 is £216,010. This funding is being used in the following ways:

  • Additional staffing in year groups with the most pupil premium pupils to help accelerate progress and narrow the achievement gap.
  • Targeted intervention in small groups or one-to-one, booster classes, holiday revision classes, additional EAL provision and speech and language support for targeted pupils.
  • Substantial investment in ICT equipment for the benefit of all our students, but with those who do not have ICT facilities at home particularly in mind.
  • Employing an Attendance & Welfare Officer who is shared with other schools in the Cranford Group to ensure the effective follow up of any attendance issues.
  • A Summer School programme focused on literacy and numeracy development through creative projects during the school holiday.

By the end of the summer term 2016, 5/12ths of the Pupil Premium funding for the year has been spent and its impact can be seen through the following outcomes:

  • 95% of pupils passing their phonics test in Year 1 with an average mark well above the national and 95% passing their phonics tests in Year 2. Pupil premium pupils achieved well above the national in both Years 1 and 2.
  • In the Early Years Foundation Stage, although pupils arrive well below national expectations they leave well above national expectations thus making excellent progress across the phase.
  • Attainment at the end of KS1 is well above the national expectations for reading, writing and maths and progress for all groups including those eligible for FSM is outstanding in those three subjects.
  • Attainment for pupil premium pupils at the end of KS2 is above or well above national expectations for combined reading, writing, maths, EGPS and science and progress for all groups including those eligible for FSM is outstanding in those subjects.

Berkeley Primary School was inspected by Ofsted on 17th and 18th June 2014 and the report published on 2nd July 2014 states that:

  • Overall, pupils make outstanding progress from very low starting points. Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage make exceptional progress.
  • Pupil premium funds are used consistently well to help eligible pupils achieve as well as, and often better than, their peers.
  • Achievement is outstanding in both English and mathematics, and often good or better in other subjects.
  • Teaching is consistently outstanding in English and mathematics. It is at least good and improving across a range of subjects. Teachers plan their lessons meticulously and have high expectations of their pupils at all times.
  • Support provided for disabled pupils, those with special educational needs and those who speak English as an additional language is comprehensive, strong and very effective.
  • Pupils who are at risk of underachieving, disabled pupils and those with special educational needs, receive tailored support both in and out of lessons. Teachers plan their learning activities to meet the needs of different ability groups. They work closely with teaching assistants to ensure that targeted pupils make at least good progress. Without exception, pupils who spoke to inspectors, praised their teachers for the support that they gave them.
  • Pupils for whom English is an additional language, disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs achieve as well as other pupils in the school. They make outstanding progress from their starting points because of the high quality level of support they receive. They become confident learners and are clearly pleased with their levels of success. This is because they are helped to take small steps towards their learning targets and are keen to show their work off to others.
  • The progress of pupils eligible for additional funding is high in both English and mathematics. Support provided through one-to-one tuition, in class support and the employment of additional teachers has reduced the attainment gap between these pupils and others across all years. Consequently, they achieve as well and sometimes better than their peers.
  • Pupils do well in acquiring a range of skills in a range of subjects. They use computers for research and to present their work in various ways.
  • School leaders have implemented highly effective literacy and numeracy policies. Pupils demonstrate well-developed and rapidly improving skills in writing, reading, communication and mathematics.
  • Attendance has risen rapidly this year and is now well above the national average. The school’s zero tolerance of term time leave and willingness to provide an extensive range of support for pupils who may be experiencing difficulties have seen attendance figures rise.
  • School clubs provide pupils with sociable and interesting activities and offer valuable facilities to parents including internet access. The summer school has the full support of parents and has engaged the interests of many pupils who are really looking forward to being involved this year.
  • Governors keep sound financial oversight of the school’s budget. They are kept informed of how additional funds are spent and can describe the outstanding progress different groups of pupils make as a result of this spending.

For the remaining two terms covered by the Pupil Premium funding, Berkeley Primary School plans to continue with the following interventions:

  • Targeted interventions as needed in small groups or one-to-one, booster classes, holiday revision classes, additional EAL provision and speech and language support for targeted pupils.
  • Continued investment in ICT equipment for the benefit of all our students, but with those who do not have ICT facilities at home particularly in mind.

 

Click here to download the Pupil Premium Statement 2016-2017 .pdf

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